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Unitarian Universalists for Jewish Awareness
Unitarian Universalists for Jewish Awareness4 days ago
I found this to be an interesting article
Unitarian Universalists for Jewish Awareness
Unitarian Universalists for Jewish Awareness2 weeks ago
Rabbi Michael Lerner's Beyt Tikkun synagogue-without-walls is calling on Jews and our non-Jewish allies to take an act of solidarity with the murdered Jews, their families, and all those who have been troubled and scared by the massacre of 11 Jews in Pittsburgh. Remembering the way that the Danish people during the second world war took an act of solidarity by wearing a yellow star to be in solidarity with Jews who were being rounded up by the Nazis to be sent to death camps, we are suggesting that all those non-Jews AND Jews put on a kippah/yarmulke (or some other form of head covering) for the 30 days of mourning, which would end at dark on November 22nd (which happens to be Thanksgiving, a good day to have that attire on as a way of raising the issue of what needs to happen to challenge anti-Semitism and all other forms of hate, particularly against African Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, gays and lesbians, and immigrants). Of course, people will ask you why you are doing that, and you can then tell them about your opposition to anti-Semitism and every other form of "othering." If you are interested in doing this and want something to read on Thanksgiving to explain to others why you are doing this, send that request to chris.tikkun@gmail.com. A kippah/yarmulke is worn by religious Jews (according to one tradition) as a symbol of humility, as though signaling that our ego ends right here at the top of our heads, and doesn't extend further into the world. Think of it also as an anti-Trump arrogance and narcissistic grandeur.
Unitarian Universalists for Jewish Awareness
Unitarian Universalists for Jewish Awareness shared Haaretz.com's post.1 month ago
Unitarian Universalists for Jewish Awareness
Unitarian Universalists for Jewish Awareness2 months ago
As Rabbi Howard Berman says
“Rosh Hashanah proclaims Judaism’s revolutionary teaching that history is not cyclical and static—as other ancient cultures believed—but rather, that human experience is dynamic and evolutionary—always progressing toward new heights and greater revelations of Divine truth. For each of us, personally, this means that we need not be bound by the limitations, patterns and regrets of the past… but rather, that there is always an opportunity to make a fresh start, and begin anew.”
Unitarian Universalists for Jewish Awareness
Unitarian Universalists for Jewish Awareness3 months ago
I thought this was an interesting article
"The difference was that while Jews prayed for such a prospect, they increasingly understood that it was up to humans to work to achieve it. In this, American Jews were influenced by the mainstream Protestantism of the Second Great Awakening, the Transcendentalists and others who substituted human agency for God’s work."